Don Quixote: Part II: Chapters 5-8

Don Quixote de la Mancha (Oxford World's Classics) - Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Charles Jarvis, E.C. Riley

 

Up to page 540

 

Italics are what I penciled in the margins

 

The block quotes are quotes from the book.

 

Everything else are just my thoughts as I’m typing along here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5

 

In which Sancho and his wife plan their future and their children's future.  A total disconnect from reality, or in other words, total B.S.

 

"I tell you, wife", answered Sancho, "that, did I not expect, ere long, to see myself a governor of an island, I should drop down dead upon the spot"

How naive can one man be?

 

 

Chapter 6

 

In which the Niece and the Maid attempt to reason with Quixote and fail miserably.

 

---without standing upon trifles, or upon the laws of duelling, ---such as, whether our adversary bears a shorter or longer lance or sword,

He just changes the rules to please himself

 

'were you not my niece... I would make such an example of you for the blasphemy you have uttered,'

but in Chapter 3 Quixote himself was saying how historians tell nothing but lies

 

and it will be in vain for you to tire yourselves in persuading me not to attempt what heaven requires, fortune ordains, and reason demands, and above all, what my inclination leads me to.

What he "wants". Everything else is just excuses to bolster his own selfish wants.

 

 

Chapter 7

 

In which the Bachelor upsets all reason and Quixote & Sancho set out upon Adventure #3

 

"What I would be at", quoth Sancho, "is, that your worship would be pleased to appoint me a certain salary, at so much per month, for the time I shall serve you,"

Sancho is learning

 

The bachelor... believed all he had read of him [Quixote], and concluded him to be one of the most solemn coxcombs of the age; and said to himself, that two such fools, as master and man, were never before seen in the world.

 

The curses, which the housekeeper and niece heaped upon the bachelor, were not to be numbered; they tore their hair, and scratched their faces,

I would have attempted violence upon Carasco himself [the Bachelor]

 

 

Chapter 8

 

In which Sancho argues eloquently and the pair head to Toboso to see Dulcinea

 

"There I have caught you," quoth Sancho.

Where did this brilliance come from?

 

"What would you have me infer, Sancho, from all you have been saying?" quoth Don Quixote

"I would infer," said Sancho, "that we had better turn saints immediately, and we shall then soon attain to that renown we aim at.

Wise words!!

 

In these and the like discourses they passed that night, and the following day, without any accident worth relating; whereat Don Quixote was not a little grieved.

Boohoo!