SPOILER ALERT!

I Don't Want to Kill You (John Cleaver #3)

I Don't Want to Kill You  - Dan Wells

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Title: I Don't Want to Kill You

Series: John Cleaver

Author: Dan Wells

Rating: 3 of 5 Stars

Genre: Paranormal

Pages: 322

Format: Kindle digital edition

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:  SPOILERS

 

John Cleaver is doing A-OK. He's getting semi-along with his mom, he's going out with the hottest girl in school and the Demon Nobody is on her way to town. What more could a young psycho ask for?

Unfortunately for John, he's not quite as smart as he thinks and when another serial killer shows up in town, he doesn't know who is Nobody and who is just the "regular" killer. Can he afford to kill and maybe get it wrong or are the stakes too high? In the end, John's selfish obsession, brain smarts and experience just aren't enough and it takes his mom sacrificing herself to kill this new demon. And John and Brooke hook up as a new Demon Hunter Duo right at the end of the book.

 

 

My Thoughts:

 

Yeaaaahhhhh [said real slow and drawn out, not excitedly].

 

This book showcases the fact that John is still a teenager and as such thinks the world revolves around him and that only HE can do anything about anything. That thinking leads directly to his mother's death. I hope it haunts him for the rest of his fictional life.

 

Beyond that, I don't have much to say about the book. If you liked the previous 2 books, you'll like this. If you didn't like them, this certainly won't change your mind.

 

I won't be reading any more by Wells though. His sick fascination with serial killers might have a place in non-fiction, but to essentially "make it palatable" and present that interest to teens and young adults in that light is irresponsible. I ranted about Wells in my review of the previous book, so I all I have to say now is "Goodbye, you sick, sick man".