Armageddon Bound (Demon Squad #1)

Armageddon Bound - Tim Marquitz

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Title: Armageddon Bound

Series: Demon Squad

Author: Tim Marquitz

Rating: 2.5 of 5 Stars

Genre: Urban Fantasy

Pages: 219

Format: Kindle digital edition

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

 

Frank Trigg, nephew of the devil, once candidate for the Anti-Christ, is now living in a post-God/Devil world. Only the demons and angels are left. Some of them want the status quo, some want to become Top Dog and some want the Cessation of All, ie, Armageddon.

 

My Thoughts:

 

Trig was born 500 years ago. No details are given, which is pretty par for this book. Things are just "told".  He has a cousin, who is an angel. Who he has redneck desires for. An ex-wife who is a succubus, who betrays him at every turn.

 

Then you have his inner thoughts. Which mostly consist of Trig commenting on how hot some woman is, or how horny he is. It is the thoughts of a 23 year old, not a supercentenarian.

 

Add in the ridiculous ideas about God and the devil, which mostly consisted of the fact that both God and the devil got sick of humanity, so they walked off into the void, or non-existence and you have the depths of this book.

 

The action was like the old video game Doom. Trig runs around like a chicken with his head cut off and shoots things and gets shot and pretty much chewed up. Then he gets a "power up" and gets healed, just in time for it all to happen again.  A fun ride if you don't mind be immersed in a 23 year old males mind.

 

From a purely technical standpoint, this was indie all the way. It was the story Marquitz wanted to tell but it lacked depth, skilled writing, polish and that indefinable something that all good books have. I'm planning on reading the next one just to see if his writing improves; if not, then this is one to avoid.