He Fell in Love with His Wife (Classic)

He Fell in Love with His Wife - Edward Payson Roe

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Title: He Fell in Love with His Wife

Series: -----

Author: Edward Roe

Rating: 4 of 5 Stars

Genre: Romance

Pages: 308

Format: Kindle digital edition

 

 

 

Synopsis:

A farmer's wife dies and leaves him on his own. After several disastrous attempts at hiring women to take care of his domestic needs, he enters into a business marriage with a woman who has been used, lied to and cast aside.

What neither of them expects is to fall in love with the other. However, when the cad who ruined the woman returns, all comes into the open and love and justice prevail.

 

My Thoughts:

After the Best Book of 2015 came from Roe (His Sombre Rivals) I deliberately lowered my expectations for this book.

 

In some ways that was a good thing. This was a rather dry romance. It was a romance that I could believe in. Nothing like those pornographic books today that are called romance but are not much more than passion and sex. It also wasn't the Jane Austen variety of romance [of which I am a big fan] with its funny, quirky, irascible, heroic and villainous characters who were in very circumscribed circumstances. However, what this was a romance that dealt with some deep issues and had some weight behind it.

 

A couple of things that I really did like:

 

 

1) One night a group of young men come to the cottage and perform some backwoods thingy, where they scream and insult the wife and husband. Well, the farmer knows that what they are saying is false but the wife doesn't and she is so afraid that she faints. The farmer then gets a hickory stick and beats the boys black and blue. But all the while he knows the boys aren't trying to harm his wife and he doesn't hold a grudge. He is punishing them for frightening her and to teach them to think before they act.

 

2) Near the end of the book the farmer confronts the man who ruined Mrs Farmer's reputation [by marrying her and hiding the fact that he was already married] and whips the man until he leaves.

 

Men are creatures of violent natures, even those most inclined to peace and tranquility. Most of the time we see that violent nature at its worst; in murder, in abuse, in rape. But when properly channeled and in a right cause, a violent man is a thing of wonder to behold.

 

So overall this book was a success for me. I have several more of Roe's book in my Calibre library and I am glad that I'll be reading more of him.